Donate and Locate Project.

Connectar’s biodiversity accredited training courses (currently in development and planning stages) will cover bee keeping, the education, implementation and management of appropriate flora and fauna for maintaining a healthy honey bee population, and theoretical and practical instruction in the management of bee hives. 

As part of our accredited City & Guilds backed Woodwise training course, beehives will be manufactured by clients and volunteers, These items will either be donated into appropriate locations into the community or sold to raise income to ensure the training centre can continue to operate.   

''We firmly believe that our approach is unique in providing solutions to the catastrophic problem in the decline of the honey bee''.

LACK OF BEES TO POLLINATE CAN MEAN A LOSS OF POSSIBLY 75% OF THE CROP FOR THE GROWER.


Of the 100 crop species that provide 90% of the world's food, over 70% of these are pollinated by bees. Insect pollination is estimated to be worth around £400 million per year to UK crop agriculture. A seminal study in 2006 found that to get the best pollination, best yields and best fruit, both wild pollinators such as common butterflies, moths, hoverflies and solitary bees are required alongside the honeybee.  

WHAT FACTORS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AS PROBABLE CONTRIBUTORY CAUSES OF HONEYBEE DECLINE?

  • Mono-cropping is the high-yield agricultural practice of growing a single crop year after year on the same land. Mono-cropping also contributes to biodiversity loss. At the beginning of the 20th century, the average farm grew five or more crop types (and usually with a mixture of crops and livestock production); at the beginning of the 21st century, the average farm was growing only one type of crop. Monocropped farms also replace formerly diverse habitats and add to the loss of native varieties of crops, flora and insects.
  • Pesticides: the use of damaging insecticides is often blamed for bee losses.
  • Lack of appropriate flora and fauna: leads to a decline in the number of flowering plants and pollen.
  • Varroa mite & Diseases: This is a parasitic mite that sucks bee blood from the bodies of honeybee larvae, pupae and adult bees. Honeybees and their larvae are affected by many diseases caused by bacteria, fungi and viruses. Research has shown a link between certain bee viruses, Varroa and colony decline. 

The strange decline of honey-bee colonies is becoming a global concern, according to the report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The authors, who include some of the world's leading honey-bee experts, issue a stark warning about the disappearance of bees, which are increasingly important as crop pollinators around the world. Without changes to the way we manage the planet, declines in the number of pollinators needed to feed a growing world population are likely to continue.   

HOW WILL CONNECTAR'S TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT RESCUE THE HONEY BEE?

WE WILL IMPLEMENT THE FOLLOWING WITHIN OUR TRAINING STRATEGY. 

  • The management of honeybees today requires more care and control in order to prevent damaging levels of varroa mites building up. We will ensure a professional level of management so that hive needs are met. We will prioritise donated hives to safe locations away from workplaces insisting on using pesticides and herbicides.
  • We will ensure that planting of appropriate flora and fauna is part of our 'donate and locate beehives' programme. We will grow flowers that bees favour: honeybees are active from late winter through to autumn, so we will ensure that we have bee-friendly plants in bloom for as much of that time as possible. 
  • We will donate beehives to schools for educational projects, to farmers, private and local authority landowners and allotment groups. We will provide hives in other agricultural and recreational areas such as orchards, park lands and golf courses.  In return, we ask for the restoration of pollinator-friendly habitats near the hive locations, in order to encourage these amazing insects to visit - thereby increasing crop and flower yields seasonally.